Understand the Role of the

Short Bowel Support
 
A Patient’s Guide to Managing a Short Bowel

Get a complimentary book created by registered dietitian Carol Rees Parrish to help patients understand the workings of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract and how to maximize what’s left of theirs.

 

 

Surgeries that can lead to SBS

Three main types of surgical resections can lead to Short Bowel Syndrome (SBS). The location and length of bowel remaining after surgery play a significant role in the outcome of SBS.


Jejunocolic anastomosis

Jejunocolic anastomosis

Jejunocolic anastomosis

In this type of surgery, the jejunum is connected to the large intestine, also called the colon. With this type of surgery, the ileum and sometimes the ileocecal valve are removed. Parts of your colon may also be removed in this procedure and the two sections are then joined.

End-jejunostomy

End-jejunostomy

End-jejunostomy

This surgery involves removal of the colon, ileum and some of the jejunum. The remaining jejunum is then connected to a surgical opening (called an ostomy) created through the skin in the belly (abdomen). In this type of surgery, a part of the small intestine will be attached to the skin of the belly, called a stoma. Stools or waste material go through the stoma into a drainage bag that is located outside of the body.

Jejunoileal anastomosis

Jejunoileal anastomosis

Jejunoileal anastomosis

In this surgery, parts of the jejunum and ileum are removed and the remaining parts are connected to the colon (anastomosis means "reconnection"). This procedure leaves the full length of the colon intact. Many people with this type of surgery do not require nutritional support.

Learn more about management of Short Bowel Syndrome.

Words appearing on this site in purple are defined in the Glossary. If you are unfamiliar with any of these words, just click on them for a definition.